Calvary Chapel – Memories I made There – Part 3

BLOG #44, SERIES 4
WEDNESDAYS WITH DR. JOE
CALVARY CHAPEL OF PHILADELPHIA
MEMORIES I MADE THERE
Part Three
October 30, 2013

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Gettysburg Weekend
Program Cover

My mind is still in a whirl after that memorable weekend. I still don’t really know what I expected to see and experience there–I only know that I was deeply moved by my being there.

Late one evening, I had a long chat with Calvary Chapel’s chief shepherd, Pastor Joe Focht. I told him I’d been deeply impressed by what I’d seen, comparing it to what I’d learned about the Post-Apostolic churches during my researching the life and times of St. Nicholas. The early Christian Church had no doctrine or creed, instead living by the Didache, a document as old as the Gospels themselves, based on Christ’s answer to the question, “What do I have to do to be saved?” His answer, according to Matthew, was “to love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, thy soul, and thy mind–and thy neighbor as thyself.” I noticed that just as Jethro advised his son-in-law, Moses, to stop micro-managing and instead select wise Spirit-led leaders, here in this church are leaders coordinating Medical Fellowship, Special Events, Single Moms, Women’s Prayer, Home Fellowship Missions, Divorce Care, Marriage and Family, Pre-marital Ministry, Men’s Repair Ministry, Hospitality, Bereavement, Worship Bible Study, Outreach, Missions, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Military Support, Russian Fellowship, Prison Ministries, Christian Alternatives to Addiction, Calvary Christian Academy, Over 50’s Ministry, Men’s Accountability, Men’s Breakfast, Hospital Visitation, Children’s Ministry, Bookstore Ministry, New Believers, Transformed College and Career, Radio Ministry, Volunteer Security, Funeral/Memorial Services, Special Needs, Sports, Puppets, Street Evangelism, Crosswalk Jr. High, Greeter and Usher Ministries, Law Enforcement Fellowship, Men’s Prayer, Combat Veterans Support Fellowship, etc.

As a result, instead of feeling I was in the midst of a church dominated by a single-personality, here it was very much like individualized ownership of the church. Each member I spoke with considered the church to be a home/safe haven, a well-organized beehive of activity and involvement. Everybody belongs. I’m not surprised that this one church has spawned twenty more Calvary Chapels in Pennsylvania. Pastor Joe told me his sermons follow the Bible clear through each year; and the following year, he does it again, continuing to study deeply as he prayerfully write new sermons each week. There appears to be no cult clustering around one
person at Calvary Chapel, but rather Pastor Joe prefers to be known as merely a fellow-seeker of spiritual knowledge and service for others. He and I discussed favorite authors and books, and before I left he gifted me with three of his favorite books by an author I’d never heard of before–I’m finding them extremely insightful; I’m planning on returning the favor. In short, with him I feel I shall enjoy many years of friendship with a kindred spirit.

It appears that Calvary Chapel pastors, rather than coming to their pulpits via divinity schools, tend to come from the rough and tumble world itself, just as was true of Christ’s apostles. It was certainly clear to me that Pastor Joe feels called.

As for Pastor Trevor Steenbakkers, my contact, guide, and chauffeur, he too I came to deeply appreciate. He is very good at what he does: shepherding the men of the church. Most certainly the women of the church are led by equally effective leadership.

I am so thankful they invited me to spend a weekend with them. I feel deeply blessed.

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Calvary Chapel – Gettysburg – Part Two

BLOG #43, SERIES 4
WEDNESDAYS WITH DR. JOE
CALVARY CHAPEL OF PHILADELPHIA
GETTYSBURG
Part 2
October 23, 2013

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Cyclorama Depiction

After days of heavy rain, the skies had finally cleared. At 7:35 a.m., I was picked up at the Radisson and ferried over to the block-long Calvary Chapel complex. Five apparently brand new 54-passenger tour buses were rapidly filling with growth-oriented men, men who knew each other well. Here and there were fathers and sons. Had to smile at the two sets of fathers and sons in the row just in front of me: it started out father/son, but it rapidly became clear that the boys preferred sitting together, so they were so accommodated. Thereafter both the two men and the two boys talked to each other non-stop.

Our bus, containing the leader, Pastor Trevor Steenbakkers, was designated Bus #1, and led the pack out of the parking lot and headed south. Initially, well over 400 had planned to go, but when our Government shut down, and the national parks, monuments, and battlefields closed, for a while it appeared the day at Gettysburg would be lost. However, Pastor Trevor was tenacious and the good people of Gettysburg (losing money at an alarming rate) were desperate enough to get creative. So here we were, heading to the most famous battlefield in America, wondering what we’d see.

After we cleared Philadelphia’s suburbs, our leader introduced a film few of us had ever seen: the four-hour-long documentary, Gettysburg; we’d see half of it going, and the other half returning. Since I’d been devouring a large book detailing the three-day battle for over a month, I found the historically accurate film riveting. What was almost surreal was watching the action in the screen above us and simultaneously experiencing/seeing outside the same hill and tree configurations depicted in the film. It was almost like theater in the round.

Immersed in the film as we were, we were jarred when the film was turned off: we were coming into Gettysburg. I’d been there before, but never before with a guide. We drew up at the Gettysburg Cyclorama complex, and within several minutes, our “soldier” guide came aboard. He told us that though we were not permitted to enter the 6,000 acre battlefield, we’d get mighty close. Though eight of the ten roads intersecting Gettysburg were federal, fortunately two were not. We’d thus be able to nibble at the battlefield from a number of angles, all of which our guide knew–in fact, he was descended from men who fought here. In short, he was living history! I have found that, in travel, a guide who is passionate about the subject literally makes a trip. And so it was here. Serendipitously, we got to experience in depth the town of Gettysburg, usually relegated to the sidelines by pilgrims who spend almost all their time on the battlefield itself. With such a guide, believe me, none of us felt shortchanged.

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Cyclorama Depiction

Afterwards, it was back to the Cyclorama complex, with its food court, large gift/book store, and the dramatic Cyclorama. During the 1880’s, the French artist Paul Philippoteaux researched, and painted what is now the largest painting in America. It took him, with his team of assistants, over a year to create the 42-foot-high and 377 feet in circumference painting. Pickett’s Charge dominates. As you walk around you can check out each portion of the battlefield. A sound and light show dramatizes it.

While half the group experienced it, I had the opportunity to answer the other half’s questions about Abraham Lincoln, the Civil War, and Gettysburg. Then I took them deeper into the significance of Gettysburg, the pivotal high-tide of the Confederacy. I discussed with them Lincoln’s epiphany when he wrote what his secretary, John Hay, called “The Meditation of the Divine Will.” In it [Hay had found it on Lincoln’s desk and secretly copied it.], Lincoln rhetorically asked why God refused to bless the armies of the North: for two long years, Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson had time after time defeated Union armies two or three times larger than they. Why? asked Lincoln. Didn’t the North have the high moral ground in God’s eyes? Finally [and I tell the fuller story in my Lincoln biography, Abraham Lincoln: A Man of Faith and Courage], Lincoln was convicted that God withheld His blessing from the North because it had refused to address the almost quarter of a millennium cancer of slavery. After much prayer, Lincoln made a vow to God that if Lee retreated from Antietam across the Potomac, he would issue the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves. Lincoln did so on January 1, 1863.

What further muddied the waters for Lincoln was his realization that both North and South prayed to the same God, asking each day for battlefield success. As if that didn’t muddy it enough, many of the slaves in the South were actually owned by absentee planters in the North. So the North came into the Civil War with anything but clean hands, where slavery was concerned.

Lee came to Gettysburg serenely confident that he would, once again, easily dispose of Union forces, led as they were by inept northern generals. After his victory, since Gettysburg was only a few miles from Washington, there would be little to prevent his victorious troops from marching on the capital. When it fell, the war would be over.

But if Lincoln was right, and his freeing the slaves six months before would be accepted by God as a clear indication that the North was at last seeking higher moral ground, then God ought to recognize that fact on the battlefield confrontations.

But, for Lee, though time after time it looked like he had the Federals on the run, now each time they miraculously regrouped. I pointed out to our Gettysburg armchair historians that:

1. Meade had only been in command of the Army of the Potomac for three days when Gettysburg cannonading began, yet he refused to buckle as had his predecessors. Nor did Hancock, his strong second in command.

2. First and foremost, Lee was missing the one indispensable person, other than himself, in the war: Stonewall Jackson, the commander the Feds feared most, for he out-thought and out-fought their generals every time. At Chancellorsville, when Jackson was killed by “friendly fire” from his own men, Lee declared he’d rather have lost his right arm. That loss contributed mightily to the results at Gettysburg.

3. Always before, the great cavalry commander, Jeb Stuart, could be counted on as Lee’s eyes and ears so that Lee would know everything about the enemy and its placements before the first shot was fired. This time, for some unexplainable reason, he was AWOL, rampaging through the Pennsylvania countryside, wreaking havoc–he wouldn’t show up until late on Day 2.

4. Without Stonewall Jackson, Lee’s second in command, Longstreet, was sulky, dragging his feet at Lee’s commands.

5. Pickett, too, was a no-show until late on Day 2.

6. And why did Lee, that military master who always knew when not to push it too far, now pushed it too far, overriding Longstreet’s strong reservations, and order Pickett’s ill-fated almost suicidal charge?

The result: Lee was forced to retreat. Had Meade and Hancock corralled the Confederate armies on the banks of the swollen Potomac River, all could have been over–but they did not, thus the war lasted two more bloody years.

Nevertheless, Gettysburg clearly represents the high tide of the Confederacy. Never again did Lee cross the Potomac. Every day thereafter, the North grew stronger and the South weaker.

It does appear that God took sides, albeit in a limited way, after Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. In Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, it is clear that Lincoln was convicted that God’s slowness in ending the bloodbath was because both North and South had near a quarter millennium’s worth of slave-related blood on their hands, thus both sides were denied an easy solution.

And Lincoln’s assassination would prolong the anguish (in the South) for yet ten more years of what was euphemistically called “Reconstruction.”

All through our time together, our reference sources were primarily my two Howard/Simon & Schuster books: Abraham Lincoln: A Man of Faith and Courage (2008); and Abraham Lincoln Civil War Stories [it includes four powerful Gettysburg stories] (2013).

All these things and more, we discussed at Gettysburg.

Afterwards, we boarded the bus and headed back to Philadelphia.

Next week, we will conclude this Calvary Chapel series.

CALVARY CHAPEL OF PHILADELPHIA – DAY ONE

    BLOG #42, SERIES 4
    WEDNESDAYS WITH DR. JOE
    CALVARY CHAPEL OF PHILADELPHIA
    DAY ONE
    October 16, 2013

I just returned from a most memorable weekend in Philadelphia and Gettysburg.  The appointment had been made a number of months ago, but until I actually arrived there I had only the haziest idea of what I might meet there.  All I knew was that a certain Pastor Trevor loved my 2008 biography, Abraham Lincoln: A Man of Faith and Courage, and wanted to know if I’d be willing to speak to his church on the subject of Abraham Lincoln.  By the time I got there, my newest book, Abraham Lincoln Civil War Stories had just arrived.

What a wonderful experience it turned out to be!

I would be dividing my time between the church’s men and their sons, and the church’s high school students.

Since I’ve never belonged to a congregation of more than 3,500 members, it was a radically new experience for me to be speaking to a church of 10,000 members, plus 5,000 teens and children.  A church with a staff of forty; sixteen being full-time pastors.

I might as well confess that up until last weekend, I didn’t think much of large or mega churches.  Mainly, I guess, because I’d never before experienced one first-hand.  With that many people, I really didn’t see how the average member could have his/her needs met.  I even wondered whether or not there might be more than a little of Elmer Gantry-ism in their leadership teams.

But rather than ramble on in generalities, let me tell you what it was like being there.  I’d be spending my first morning with about 500 of their teens attending Calvary Christian Academy.  I spent considerable time at home writing what I hoped would be an interesting lecture, but, as I continued to pray about the weekend, gradually I was convicted that I ought to ask Pastor Trevor if he’d be willing to get the young people to write out questions that intrigued or interested them (on subjects such as Lincoln, writing, authors, reading, life, etc.—whatever might be on their hearts).  He relayed that message to the teachers.   And so it was, after a three-hour rain delay, I arrived late; but there was this imposing stack of questions—and I’d be speaking to them the next morning.  I finished at 1 a.m.  Believe me, they’d taken me at my word: Here are just a few of their questions:

    PUBLIC SPEAKING

•    How do you handle talking to large groups?
•    Were you always good at speaking to large groups?  If not, how did you overcome that fear?

    READING/WRITING

•    Do you have to know how to use direct objects and predicate nominatives to be a writer?
•    Do you have to be a good reader and like to read to be a good writer?
•    How does journaling help you become a better writer?
•    As a journaler, do people write about their lives or what went on in the world?
•    Does traveling to historic places give you inspiration?

    QUESTIONS DIRECTED AT ME

•    How do you become an author?
•    What is your favorite color?
•    How did you come to know God?
•    What is it like knowing people are reading books you wrote?
•    How do you know what God’s plan is for your life?
•    What is your favorite ice cream flavor?
•    Why did you decide to write biographies about people?
•    Do you ever run out of ideas to make your books better than your previous books?
•    How do you create great books that are interesting to most age groups yet talk about God too?
•    How does it feel to be known and famous?
•    What do you do when you don’t know what to write about?
•    As a professional writer to a young writer, what is the best way to improve one’s writing capability?
•    Which of your works are you most proud of?

    ABRAHAM LINCOLN

•    How long did you study Abraham Lincoln for your book?
•    What made Lincoln a great leader?
•    What do you think was Lincoln’s greatest flaw?
•    In your opinion, what was the single most difficult decision made during Lincoln’s presidency?
•    Was Lincoln a Christian man?
•    What was the hardest decision Lincoln had to make as president?
•    When Lincoln was president, did he have people to discuss his decisions with, and did they agree or disagree?
•    Was Lincoln personally interested in freeing slaves?  Or was it just a political move?
•    How did Lincoln feel about his widespread fame?  How did he handle it and stay humble?
•    Why in most photos does Lincoln wear a top hat?
•    Did Lincoln struggle with the paparazzi?
•    Elaborate on the dream Lincoln had just before he died.
•    How do you think our nation would be different without Lincoln and his faith in God?
•    The Gettysburg Address is one of the most famous speeches in history.  Yet he went after another man.  Could you tell us about him?
•    What was the single event in Lincoln’s life that set the stage for what he became?
•    Did Lincoln want to be president as a child?

    * * * * *

As you can see, their questions were not only insightful, they reveal that their Calvary Christian Academy history teachers really teach their students history!  Many college students today wouldn’t have been able to field questions as deep as many of these.  Nor be as knowledgeable about history.

Not only that, but they were most attentive, alert, interested in the subject, and respectful.  Afterwards, a number came up front to ask for my autograph—one wanted it on her wrist. 🙂

    THE FAITH OF LINCOLN

In the evening, I spoke to 400 – 500 fathers and sons about Lincoln’s faith in God–while young; when as an adult he put God on hold for many years, and then when his second son, Eddie, died, how he recognized his great need for God; and finally how, during the Civil War, only his moment by moment reliance on God made it possible for him to face the horrific casualties (620,000 – 750,000), more than all the rest of our wars put together).  I also discussed the need for parents to return to the daily story hour so that they can minister to their children’s spiritual  needs from day to day.

Afterwards, for several hours, I signed their Lincoln books (both the biography and the new story anthology).

Then I was ferried back to the motel.  Next day was Gettysburg.  Will fill you in on that next week—what it was like during the government shutdown!

CHRISTMAS IN MY HEART #22 IS HERE!

Scan_Pic0052BLOG #41, SERIES 4
WEDNESDAYS WITH DR. JOE
CHRISTMAS IN MY HEART #22
October 9, 2013

NEWS RELEASE

Joe L. Wheeler, Ph.D. is pleased to announce the arrival of his 82nd book, Christmas in My Heart® #22 (Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2013). How mightily God has blessed this series! Amazingly, still alive and energetic 21 years after the dream was born with that unnumbered Christmas in My Heart® collection back in 1992, and now the longest-running Christmas story series in America.

Way back then, Joe and Connie Wheeler had not even an inkling that that white-colored book with a Currier & Ives illustration on its cover represented a life-changing force that would radically change the course of the rest of their lives.

Those simple common denominators: horizontal trade-paper cover with a Currier & Ives illustration, old-timey woodcut illustrations inside, and stories chosen for their spiritual values and their emotive power (think Kleenex®) would go on to become that rarity: an unchanging and dependable icon of Christmas, faithfully showing up on time for every new Christmas.

This year, the cover is printed in a gorgeous metallic blue, Currier & Ives-ish cover art created by George Henry Durrie and cover design by Steve Largo.

Two Christmases ago, Pacific Press celebrated the series’ 20th anniversary with a beautiful multi-colored bookmark, image taken from the book’s cover illustration. By itself, the bookmark spiked sales. A Barnes & Noble manager told Wheeler that his bookmark was more beautiful than most of those sold in their bookstores for five dollars each. And a tassel to boot!

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Well, that bookmark made such a splash that the publisher was persuaded to create another for Christmas in My Heart® #21. By then, devotees of the series (many thousands now had all 21, calling themselves “Christmas in My Heart Completists”) now considered the newest books to be naked without the now obligatory tassel. So it came to be that for most of a month now, in the Boise, Idaho publishing headquarters and plant, almost everyone has been hand-tying tassels on the newest bookmark. Just imagine that: a twenty-first century publishing house caring enough about a mass-produced product to hand-craft a tasseled bookmark for each book!

If you already have one of those heirloom matched sets, of course you’ll buy the new collection right away, so you can savor the stories all the way through the 52 Days of Christmas (the interlocking three seasons: Nicholastide, Advent, and Christmastide, concluding on January 6), as well as re-read your favorite stories in the previous 21 collections.

On the other hand, nothing is sequential in the series; each book being a stand-alone story collection. Second, these stories are anything but same ol’ same ol’, for Wheeler made a vow to God that if ever a new collection should prove to be weaker than those before, then he would terminate the series right there! Note his statement on the back of this collection:

As I ever so slowly chose the stories that would grace this series, each day I prayed that God would choose the finalists, not me. As usual, it took many drafts [more than ten] before I felt confident that God had signed off on the collection.

It is once again my humble prayer that God will bless each person, each family, as they vicariously experience the stories in the newest collection.

–Joseph Leininger Wheeler

Just to give you a feel for this new collection, all the following stories are included:

Introduction: “A Child Looks at Christmas,” by Joseph Leininger Wheeler
“Our Little Lamb,” by Cath Delaney
“The Gifts of Joy,” by Pearl S. Buck
“The Season’s Greetings,” by Margaret Weymouth Jackson
“Christmas Emergency,” by Ann Howard
“Christmas on Dock Street,” by Seth Harmon
“Lesson in a Stable,” by Clarence S. Hill
“Think Big,” by Elizabeth F. Noon
“Happy Miracle,” by Charles G. Muller
“When Polly Ann Played Santa Claus,” by Eleanor H. Porter
“The Big Christmas Present,” by Eleanor Hoyt Brainerd
“Christmas Express,” by B. J. Chute
“Barby,” by Persis Gardiner
“The Man Who Had Nothing to Give,” by Marie Harmon
“Once Upon a Time,” by Christine McKerrell
“Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow,” by Joseph Leininger Wheeler

A word about Wheeler’s Christmas stories. This one is the longest Christmas romance he has ever written–it had to be with a cast of 20 characters!~ His Christmas romances are cherished by so many that in 2014, Howard/Simon & Schuster is publishing a self-standing collection of his Christmas love stories. Another reason this one is so long is that it is really a novelette-length story about living; consequently, Wheeler incorporates into it all the key motivational poems and quotations he’s used for his students during his long teaching career. It also incorporates the settings frontier writer Zane Grey loved most. And lastly, Wheeler never writes a story unless God first joins forces with him. Note his explanation of what happened with this story (on p. 122):

“Without question, with twenty characters, this is by far the most complex story I have ever tackled. But even after I’d written twenty-five pages, the words remained flat on their backs; no vital signs whatsoever. In near desperation, I prayed day after day that God would come to my rescue so I could meet my book deadline. Then, at 4:00 a.m. on the morning of October 19, 2012, God gifted me with a dream in which all twenty characters miraculously sprang to life, a number with distinct personalities. I got up, ruefully looked at the twenty-five pages, and started all over again. But this time, I was dealing with three-dimensional characters who created their own plot–I had no idea as to where they’d end up or how. Only God knew.”

* * *

Price is $13.99, plus $5.00 packaging and shipping. For those interested in picking up the entire set at a great Christmas season discount, retail for the 22 books in the core series (published by Review and Herald 1-16, and Pacific Press 17-22) is $262.78. But you may purchase it from us during this Christmas season for only $160.00 (over $100 discount). Should you wish to insure story completion, by also purchasing the Focus on the Family/Tyndale House hardbacks #13 and #15 (includes three stories not in the core series), retail would be $299.77; sale price would be $175.00. U.S. shipping (includes packaging, insurance and UPS home delivery) would come to $35.00 for the complete set of 22 or 24 books.

Upon request, Wheeler personally signs or inscribes each book at no extra cost to the purchaser.

Write to me at P.O. Box 1246, Conifer, CO 80433.

Published in: on October 9, 2013 at 5:00 am  Comments (1)  

A NEW “LOST GENERATION”?

BLOG #40, SERIES 4
WEDNESDAYS WITH DR. JOE
A NEW “LOST GENERATION”?
October 2, 2013

The most famous “Lost Generation” was the post-World War I generation who came of age in the war and Jazz Age that followed. The term was coined in a letter Gertrude Stein wrote to Ernest Hemingway, “You are all a lost generation.” Hemingway then incorporated it into his 1926 novel, The Sun Also Rises, that captures the attitudes and life style of the hard-drinking, fast-living, hedonistic, and disillusioned young expatriates living in Paris (authors such as Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Dos Passos, e. e.. cummings, Archibald Mac Leish, Hart Crane, and others).

These writers considered themselves lost because the unbelievably brutal so-called “Great War” had stripped them of their illusions, turned them away from religion and spiritual values, and left them in a twilight world in which nothing made sense. Not surprisingly, it segued into theater of the absurd writers such as Pinter, Ionesco, Brecht, and Beckett, who wrote plays in which little or nothing made much sense.

On the front page of the weekend Wall Street Journal (September 14, 15), was a jolting article by Ben Casselman and Marcus Walker titled “Help Wanted: Struggles of a Lost Generation.”

In it, the writers postulate that the economic meltdown of the last five years has created a group of young people who have come of age during the most prolonged period of economic distress since the Great Depression. Only this time, unlike the earlier “Lost Generation,” today’s young people are lost because the economic underpinnings they assumed their education prepared them for, are no longer there now that they have graduated and are looking for such jobs.

They are worse off in another respect: they are saddled with student loans that, in good times, they could gradually pay off, but in bad times (think no job at all, minimum wage, or part-time jobs), they don’t see how they can ever pay them off! The writers note that the unemployment rate for Americans under the age of 25 is two and a half times higher than the rate for those 25 or older. But even that rate ignores the hundreds of thousands of young people who are going back to college, enrolling in training programs, or just sitting on the sidelines.

The writers, backed up by Pew Research studies, feel that today’s young people are likely to suffer long-term consequences for their current inability to get full-time decent-paying jobs: “Economic research has shown that the first few years after college plays an outside role in determining workers’ career trajectories: about two-thirds of wage growth, on average, comes in the first ten years of a person’s career. In weak economic times, graduates are likely accept lower wages and work for smaller companies with fewer opportunities for advancement. And in many cases, they never move off that second-tier track.”

They also note that our weak economy is leading to potentially seismic societal changes: “An
entire generation is putting off the rituals of early adulthood: moving away, getting married, buying a home and having children.” 56% of 18-24-year-olds are living with their parents.

In earlier times, young people could at least look forward to a strong recovery, however all the current projections are for a long weak economic recovery, and by the time it finally does happen, the bloom will long since have been gone from the degrees of untold thousands of young people caught in the backwash of today’s global fiscal collapse.

In Europe, it is even worse today for this age-group: “Over 23% of the European Union’s workforce under age 25 is unemployed, and youth jobless rates in the worse-hit European countries approaches 60%.”

* * * * *

Although Casselman and Walker’s economic study contains plenty of doom and gloom, it appears to me it is nowhere near as bad as the generation that graduated in 1929 and had to face the Great Depression when things were so bad life could be summed up in that generation’s six-liner: “Brother, can you spare a dime?” (A dime could get you a simple meal back then.)

Perhaps we shall need to re-evaluate the entire educational construct. With four years of college now costing $100,000 – $200,000, it may be necessary to come up with an entirely new method of preparing our youth for their adult life and careers.